Regency Cornices

Heritage Range

TM

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C6 - Regency Waterleaf Cornice

Depth: 165mm

Projection: 150mm

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C8 - Regency Acanthus Leaf

Depth: 150mm

Projection: 95mm

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C18 - Large Regency Acanthus Leaf

Depth: 120mm

Projection: 235mm

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C19 - Large Regency Waterleaf

Depth: 240mm

Projection: 230mm

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C34 - Regency Anthemion Cornice

Depth: 235mm

Projection: 159mm

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C35 - Ladbrook Regency Cornice

Depth: 145mm

Projection: 330mm

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C48 - Regency Waterleaf

Depth: 130mm

Projection: 120mm

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C56 - Regent Barrel Cornice

Depth: 100mm

Projection: 245mm

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C69 - Regency Plain Cornice

Depth: 90mm

Projection: 135mm

GENUINE REGENCY CORNICE STYLES

 

John Nash was responsible for much of Regency London, which was defined by grand, long terraces or crescents such as those along Regent Street, Regent Park and (pictured) Carlton House Terrace:

 

Typically more restrained than Palladian interiors, Regency period interiors had furniture, wallpaper and window drapery as their focus, with cornices and other mouldings being much more understated, more delicate and generally known for their low-relief.

 

The most common moulding of the period, and the moulding that most reflected the simplicity and restraint of the period’s plasterwork, was the bead. Reeding (combinations of two or more linked beads, adjoining the adjacent surface) was applied to everything from cornices and skirting to door and chimney surrounds.

 

Waterleaf cornices are a great example of the neo-classical influence on Regency period plaster mouldings, with their sharp leaf detailing remaining ever-popular today.

 

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Southbrook Road
Gloucester
Gloucestershire
GL4 3YY

Tel:  01452 300071
Fax: 01452 300087

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